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Pine Marten

Pine Marten

Winter is here in Aspen and our first big snow fell on January 7th. Of course I was out snowboarding on the mountain. Unfortunately a few wrong moves on my first run and I found myself in a tumble. To make a long story short, I fractured my arm. It was definitely a bummer… but this blog isn’t about me feeling bad about myself. Nature always seems to have a way of turning things around for me. Just a few days later I was waiting for guests to arrive so I could lead a snowshoe tour at Snowmass.


Why Do You Farm?

Posted in Ranch Report
Pig

I was just signing up to join a web community of young farmers and was asked on the survey, Why do you farm?  Those four little words really got me thinking, and here's what popped out!


Community Calls Speaker and Workshop Series

Posted in Bulletin Board
Bottom Ranch

Rock Bottom Ranch presents the Community Calls Speaker and Workshop Series!

Every Tuesday in February and March 2012
Community Calls Speaker Series invites Roaring Fork Valley food and wildlife experts to discuss issues of sustainable food production, wildlands preservation, and local economy through an evening lecture with time for questions.

Utilizing Our Local Ingredients: Embracing Fat

Posted in Ranch Report

At ACES’ Rock Bottom Ranch, live remarkably happy and healthy pigs. They spend their days wallowing in baths of cool mud or grazing in the pastures. They are given respect and attention by the steady flow of staff and visitors that frequent their domain, and used as educational tools to demonstrate to the public the importance of preserving heritage breed pigs.


In the Woodpile

While splitting some aspen on Sunday I came across a perfect circular hole the diameter of my finger in one of the cut ends. A strike with the maul and the wood split along the hole. Inside was what looked like a green leafy cigar divided into six sections. In each chamber a leaf-cutter bee larva (genus Megachile) is overwintering. Inside it is nourished by pollen ball provided by the female who dug the cavity, cut the leaves, and laid the eggs. Leaf-cutting bees are solitary bees unlike hive forming honey bees and yellow jackets.