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Creepy Crawly Night, 2012

Posted in Kids' Corner

Happy Halloween from Aspen Center for Environmental Studies! On the evening of Monday, October 22nd, ACES hosted 'Creepy Crawly Night' for all Aspen Elementary School second grade students and their families. The Hallam Lake Nature Center was decked out in spooky decorations, spider webs, and information and crafts involving our favorite creepy crawly Aspen animals, like spiders and bats. Some of our resident indoor animals made a special appearance, such as the ball python, the Eastern box turtle, and the Western tiger salamander.


Join us for ACES' Annual Harvest party at Rock Bottom Ranch

Posted in Bulletin Board
Harvest Party

This Saturday Rock Bottom Ranch hosts a harvest festival like no other! Enjoy pumpkin carving, face-painting, ranch games and pony rides. Party-goers can learn how to press their own apple cider and visit with our beloved farm animals! But this party isn't just for the little ones: a delicious lunch by Crystal River Meats and Whole Foods will complement beer and wine sponsored by Four Dogs Fine Wine and Spirits, and hard cider generously donated by Blossomwood Cidery.


Backpacking with Kids: A Whole New Adventure

Posted in Kids' Corner

"Mami, are we there yet?"


Being Bear Aware

Bear looks trough two trees
One of the most enjoyable aspects of living in Aspen is the ease of access to nature.  The close proximity also gives many animals easy access to the city. As Aspen dwellers, we must live responsibly in this place in order to facilitate safe urban/wildlife interactions.
 
In September, bear activity goes into hyperdrive.  Bears will begin hibernating in late October/early November, so now is their final push to gain as much weight as possible.

Smuggler Mountain Restoration Work

Overgrown gamble oak on Smuggler Mountain
ACES' Forest Health Program (formerly For the Forest) is excited about upcoming collaborations with local and federal government agencies to promote healthy, resilient forest.
 
Beginning today ACES, the City of Aspen, and Pitkin County Open Space are working together on three restoration projects in the wildland-urban interface on Smuggler Mountain. Each project seeks to improve wildlife habitat, and reduce fuel loads in different vegetation types: Gambel oak, lodgepole pine, and aspen.

A Sapsucker's Busy Work

When scanning a cluster of river-side serviceberry bushes through my binoculars on a recent birding excursion, a light honeycomb-shaped mosaic caught my eye. After closer inspection (and a hint from ACES' Naturalist Rebecca Weiss) we decided the grid was the result of a busy red-naped sapsucker.