Snowshoe and Ski Tours

Travel along mountain streams, over ridgelines, and through beautiful valleys in the Aspen area while learning about mountain ecology on ACES' naturalist guided snowshoe tours. Starting on December 16th, daily snowshoe tours will be offered on top of Aspen Mountain, Snowmass Mountain, and at the Ashcroft Ghost Town.

Aspen Mountain tours will meet daily at the top of the Aspen Mountain gondola at 10AM and 1PM. Tickets are $63 for adults, $56 for youth and seniors, and $43 for children.  Purchase tickets at any lift ticket office.

Politics of Sustainability Lectures | Auden Schendler

Auden Schendler, Vice President of Sustainability at Aspen Skiing Company, will speak about the realities of being "green" in today's world, shown through the lens of Aspen Skiing Company’s efforts to be the most environmentally responsible ski company in the business.

Aspen Center for Environmental Studies is now home to the long-successful Tomorrow’s Voices program, founded by local teachers AO Forbes and Willard Clapper to cultivate responsible citizenship and ethical leadership in the youth of the Roaring Fork Valley.

Each year, they open up a selection of their Politics of Sustainability classes to the public. Join us on these Monday nights at 6:30pm in the auditorium of Roaring Fork High School in Carbondale for what are sure to be inspiring inter-generational conversations.

Free Members
Free Non Members
9/29/2014

6:30PM
Roaring Fork High School Auditorium

Earth Day Party

Celebrate Earth Day with food, music, and conversation and make a pledge committing to a new sustainable action for 2014! Representatives from Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, the City of Aspen, the Community Office of Resource Efficiency, WEcycle, and Pitkin County will be available to help with pledges and supply attendees with free tools and resources to achieve their commitments.
Contact Ada Christensen at ada.christensen@cityofaspen.com or 970-429-1749 for more information.
4/22/2014

12:00PM - 1:30PM
Mill Street Pedestrian Mall at Wagner Park

A Fire History of the Hunter Creek Valley

This Naturalist Night has been cancelled (both Carbondale and Aspen presentations). We will put word out if the speaker is able to reschedule. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Fire is a critical ecosystem process shaping patterns of forest characteristics from stands to landscapes in the western United States. Following a century of fire suppression practices in the region, natural patterns of wildfire have been significantly altered in many forest types, resulting in significant ecological consequences. Specifically, unnatural patterns of fire have resulted in unnatural forest conditions (species composition and tree density) and set the stage for extensive, high-severity fires and bark beetle outbreaks. Consequently, forest ecosystem management actions are focused on restoring forests to pre-fire suppression characteristics. Restoring forests to natural conditions has the added benefit of increasing forest resilience to the impacts of climate change. However, not all forests have been impacted by fire suppression, and management activities intended to restore stands in these forests could actually create unnatural forest conditions and decrease system resilience to climate change impacts. Consequently, it is essential to identify the need for restoration for individual sites and forest types before implementing restoration activities.
In this talk Jason will present results from a tree-ring based reconstruct of fire history for Smuggler Mountain and the Hunter Creek drainage, and their implications for the need for forest restoration at the site.

Jason S. Sibold is an assistant professor of geography in the Department of Anthropology at Colorado State University. Dr. Sibold’s research focuses on the role of wildfire, insect outbreaks and their interactions in shaping forests in the US RockyMountains and southern Chile. Dr. Sibold was recently called to testify before the House Committee on Natural Resources on the scientific understanding of bark beetle outbreaks and their interactions with wildfires. His research is supported by the National Park Service, US Geological Survey, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Fulbright Scholars Program and Joint Fire Sciences Program and has been published in journals including Ecological Applications, Journal of Biogeography, Canadian Journal of Forest Research and Landscape Ecology.

Free Members
Free Non Members
3/06/2014
Hallam Lake
7:00PM - 8:00PM

A Fire History of the Hunter Creek Valley

Fire is a critical ecosystem process shaping patterns of forest characteristics from stands to landscapes in the western United States. Following a century of fire suppression practices in the region, natural patterns of wildfire have been significantly altered in many forest types, resulting in significant ecological consequences. Specifically, unnatural patterns of fire have resulted in unnatural forest conditions (species composition and tree density) and set the stage for extensive, high-severity fires and bark beetle outbreaks. Consequently, forest ecosystem management actions are focused on restoring forests to pre-fire suppression characteristics. Restoring forests to natural conditions has the added benefit of increasing forest resilience to the impacts of climate change. However, not all forests have been impacted by fire suppression, and management activities intended to restore stands in these forests could actually create unnatural forest conditions and decrease system resilience to climate change impacts. Consequently, it is essential to identify the need for restoration for individual sites and forest types before implementing restoration activities.
In this talk Jason will present results from a tree-ring based reconstruct of fire history for Smuggler Mountain and the Hunter Creek drainage, and their implications for the need for forest restoration at the site.

Jason S. Sibold (PhD) is an assistant professor of geography in the Department of Anthropology at Colorado State University. Dr. Sibold’s research focuses on the role of wildfire, insect outbreaks and their interactions in shaping forests in the US RockyMountains and southern Chile. Dr. Sibold was recently called to testify before the House Committee on Natural Resources on the scientific understanding of bark beetle outbreaks and their interactions with wildfires. His research is supported by the National Park Service, US Geological Survey, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute, Fulbright Scholars Program and Joint Fire Sciences Program and has been published in journals including Ecological Applications, Journal of Biogeography, Canadian Journal of Forest Research and Landscape Ecology.

Free Members
Free Non Members
2/06/2014
Hallam Lake
7:00PM - 8:00PM

Rock Bottom Ranch Farm Tour

Join a RBR Naturalist for a farmyard tour to meet the animals and Rock Bottom Ranch and learn where food comes from! Participants will be able to explore the ranch, perform “ranch chores” like collecting eggs, herding sheep and more. 
Moms’ groups, school groups and groups larger than one family, please call ahead to make a reservation 970-927-6760.

$10 suggested donation per family / free for members

12/01/2013 - 4/30/2014
Rock Bottom Ranch
Monday - Friday
11AM

The Wilderness Act in an Era of Global Climate Change

2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Wilderness Act, intended “to assure that an increasing population, accompanied by expanding settlement and growing mechanization, does not occupy and modify all areas within the United States and is possessions, leaving no lands designated for preservation and protection in their natural condition…” In the intervening years, through the action of visionary leaders and countless citizen activists, the National Wilderness Preservation System has grown to over 100 million acres, a remarkable achievement. But over those same years, so too has grown the scale of threats to the “natural condition” of wilderness. Acid rain and other atmospheric deposition, changes in land use outside wilderness, invasive species, and climate change now threaten to undermine the “preservation and protection” of wilderness ecosystems. This presentation will explore the place of wilderness in an altered future as well as changes in management that may be needed to ensure that wilderness continues to play its vital societal role well into the future.

Gregory H. Aplet is Senior Science Director in the Wilderness Society's Denver office. He holds a B.S. in Forestry (1981) and an M.S. in Wildland Resource Science (1983) from the University of California, Berkeley and a Ph.D. in Forest Ecology (1987) from Colorado Sate University. He is author of numerous publications on the effects of disturbances on Rocky Mountain and Hawaiian forests, the ecology of biological invasions, the conservation of biological diversity, and wildland fire and wilderness management

Free Members
Free Non Members
2/27/2014
Hallam Lake
7:00PM - 8:00PM

Aspen Meadows Snowshoe Tour

Explore the Aspen Meadows Campus and a wild pocket along the Roaring Fork River with an ACES Naturalist on an all inclusive snowshoe tour including lunch at the popular and unique Platos restaurant. The tour will begin by descending along Castle Creek to the confluence of the Roaring Fork River. Meandering along a narrow trail along the river banks, your naturalist guide will share expertise on animal tracking, the importance of river ecosystems, and more. Though the tour is held at a leisurely pace, you'll work up an appetite and head back up the river bank for a walk through the Aspen Institute campus to the Meadows and a tranquil, delicious lunch at Platos. Tours are offered daily by reservation at 11AM through a partnership between ACES and the Aspen Meadows.
 
    •    Offered everyday at 11AM
    •    48 hours advance reservations required, call ACES at 970-925-5756, Monday - Friday, 9AM-4:30PM.
    •    $75/person ($50/child) includes a 1-hour guided tour, snowshoes and prixe fixe lunch at Platos (tax and tip included).
    •    Tours leave from the Aspen Meadows reception area at 11AM
    •    Free Meadows shuttle leaves from Ruby Park at 10:30AM, returning to town at 1:00 and 1:30.
    •    Tours take place on varied terrain at a leisurely pace
    •    Warm, waterproof boots, winter clothing, sunscreen, and water are strongly recommended
    •    2 adult minimum required to run the tour
    •    Call ACES Mon-Fri, 9am-4:30pm with any questions

Reservations are necessary - call 970-925-5756 (please dial 0 after hours and leave a message - we will return your call promptly) or request a tour by clicking on the RSVP button below. Requests with less than 24 hour notice, phone calls only.

12/29/2013 - 4/18/2014

11AM

Birds of Prey Valentines Drive

Whoooooo’s Your Valentine?

This Valentine's Day, send a unique, hand-made, heart-shaped birdseed valentine to someone special and help underwrite this summer's Raptor Fair.  

For $20 your valentine will be gift wrapped and mailed in a special box with a personalized tag featuring a raptor pun of your choice:

1. Happy Valentines Day! 
2. Owl be yours!
3. Friends of a feather.
4. You make my heart soar!
5. Whoooo's Your Valentine?

Recipients can hang the natural ornament outside for hours of bird entertainment.

You may order multiple valentines to be sent to different addresses.  
Suggested order dates for delivery by February 14th: February 7th for out of town delivery and February 11th for Aspen/Snowmass shipping.
 
Additional support for ACES Raptor Residency and Education Program provides funds to care for our new, non-releasable Red-tailed Hawk at Hallam Lake. Read her story here.


Save the date for this summer's Raptor Fair - Thursday July 3, 2014, 3PM - 5PM

 

1/23/2014 - 2/14/2014
Hallam Lake

Pecha Kucha: A Fast-paced Storytelling for the Thompson Divide

A Pecha Kucha is a modern Japanese tradition of fast-paced lively story telling; each participant shows exactly 20 slides for 20 seconds each. Due to popular demand, the Pecha Kucha Thompson Divide Troupe is back to present their passion and connection to the Thompson Divide. Presentations are both informative and artistic, leaving audience members re-inspired and reminded of the importance of this special place.

The Thompson Divide Pecha Kucha Troupe is comprised of passionate and creative Roarking Fork Valley locals dedicated to protecting the Thompson Divide from being drilled for natural gas. The Troupe includes a local teacher, student, health professional, sustainable farmer, graphic artist, slam poet, columinst, engineer, and several environmental stewards.

Tea, donated by Two Leaves Tea Company and Paradise Bakery cookies will be offered during lecture.

The Pecha Kucha troop will also present on Wednesday, February 19 at 5:30 at Carbondale's Third Street Center.

Naturalist Nights are brought to you through a partnership between Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, Wilderness Workshop and Roaring Fork Audubon.

Free Members
Free Non Members
2/20/2014
Hallam Lake
7:00PM - 8:00PM
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