Morning Birding Species List | May 21, 2019

Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 7AM - 10AM
Weather: Low clouds, light rain, just below snowline following a spring snowstorm.
Location: Rock Bottom Ranch

Species Identified
Canada Goose (with goslings)
Mallard
Ring-necked Duck
Rock Pigeon
Broad-tailed Hummingbird
Killdeer (with chicks)
Wilson's Snipe
Great Blue Heron
Osprey
Red-tailed Hawk
Northern Flicker
American Kestrel
Flycatcher sp.
Warbling Vireo
Black-billed Magpie
American Crow
Common Raven
Violet-green Swallow
House Wren
American Robin
Evening Grosbeak
Pine Siskin
Spotted Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Yellow Warbler


Comments:

With late season snowstorms rolling through the valley regularly this month, spring is late in terms of vegetation and birds that are migrating or in a holding pattern before winter loosens its grip on the high country are actively foraging and spending time in unusual places. Today's weather worked in our favor to bring out birds especially in places with concentrations of food. Spring baby highlights today were Killdeer chicks and Canada goslings. We observed a Raven carrying food and female Red-winged Blackbirds gathering nesting material. Male Broad-tailed Hummingbirds, Wilson's Snipe, Red-winged Blackbirds, and Yellow Warblers were singing and displaying. We had excellent looks at a perched Red-tailed Hawk and American Kestrel, as well as the Killdeer family. Today's most recent migratory arrival (as observed by the birding program) was a Warbling Vireo. We expect more flycatchers to arrive any day, but the late snow/rain seems to have delayed insect hatches and the arrival of these birds in the mid and upper valley. Join us Thursday for the first field trip in the Birding By Habitat series: Pinyon-Juniper and Riparian Habitats, concentrating in the mid valley and visiting high quality habitats on special private properties, with one location at the edge of the Lake Christine fire. 

~ Rebecca Weiss, ACES Bird Guide 

 

Photo by Dale Armstrong