Morning Birding Species List | June 18, 2019

Tuesday, June 18, 2019, 6:30AM - 9:30AM
Weather: Mostly cloudy
Location: Hallam Lake and Meadowood pond

Species Identified
Canada Goose
Mallard
Broad-tailed Hummingbird
American Coot
Spotted Sandpiper
Great Blue HEron
Osprey
Belted Kingfisher
Northern Flicker
Peregrine Falcon
Western Wood-pewee
Cordilleran Flycatcher
Warbling Vireo
Steller's Jay
Black-billed Magpie
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
Mountain Chickadee
House Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
House Finch
Pine Siskin
Green-tailed Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Wilson's Warbler


Comments:

Cloudy weather kept the bird activity high through the morning, providing us with an extended 'prime time' for birding today. Highlights at Hallam Lake included an osprey eating a large brook trout, a spotted sandpiper, a close look at a Lincoln's sparrow, and ruby-crowned kinglets with red crowns showing. There is a new osprey platform that has been installed above the lake on private property. Ospreys continue to be very active at Hallam Lake, and the platform might be attractive to these birds that may return and possibly breed in a future summer. High streamflows in the Roaring Fork River have raised the water table and trails are beginning to flood. At Meadowood pond (with permission of the Meadowood HOA), highlights were yellow-rumped warblers, a Wilson's warbler, tree and violet-green swallows flying at eye level for excellent observations, a female hummingbird that was possibly gathering spider silk for nesting material, and a peregrine falcon that zoomed through. The falcon was on a fast, direct course as it flew across the meadow, giving those who saw it a very good look at its size and color patterns. It may have been hunting swallows. Join us on Saturday, June 22nd for a class on how to Ebird with Susan Foster! Learn how to submit your birding observations to Ebird, crowd-sourcing data from birders to scientists working on bird conservation.

~ Rebecca Weiss, ACES Bird Guide 

 

Photo by Dale Armstrong